Intimidated by all the steps and processes involved with making homemade bone broth? Short on time, patience, and desire to spend more time in the kitchen? Then I’d like to introduce to you my simple homemade chicken bone broth recipe.

The History of Homemade Bone Broth

Bone broth has a long and rich history of medicinal and culinary uses. In addition to being a staple in many professional kitchens, homemade bone broth (or stock) made from animal bones was used by many cultures around the world to support digestive health, immune function, and of course—to create traditional stews and soups.

Traditional practices like eating organ meats and making bone broth allowed our ancestors to make use of all of the parts of the animals they hunted, which provided deeper nutrition, and showed respect for the animal giving its life to sustain others.

Homemade Bone Broth Benefits

So, why is this simple homemade chicken bone broth so special? Bones are made up of minerals and amino acids, including calcium, magnesium, collagen, chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine. Simmering bones in water for an extended period of time slowly breaks down the bone to release all of the glorious nutrients it contains. The end result? A liquid “gold” that’s incredibly nutrient-dense, and packed full of culinary potential.

Many of the nutrients found in homemade bone broth are super for reducing joint pain and inflammation, boosting the immune system, and supporting digestive and detoxification function.

Homemade bone broth is also one of the most dense sources of powerful nutrients like collagen and chondroitin sulphates, which is why this traditional food has recently been making a comeback. It’s also why chicken soup has been the long-standing remedy for colds and upper respiratory issues since Grandma was a kid (and beyond!)

Why I Love Homemade Chicken Bone Broth

Chicken Cooked - Coconuts & Kettlebells

This homemade chicken bone broth recipe is incredibly easy to make, and will fit right into your schedule—so much so that you’ll barely even know you’re making homemade bone broth.

Bone Broth Recipe - Coconuts & Kettlebells

As a side note, this recipe will not produce the most unbelievably-tasting homemade bone broth you’ve ever had in your life. My priorities and desires do not include becoming a bone broth connoisseur, so for me—this recipe creates a tasty homemade bone broth, which is perfect for my non-professional kitchen.

Homemade Bone Broth Recipe

The reason why this homemade chicken bone broth recipe is so fantastically easy is because it can quickly be set into motion after cooking a whole chicken in the crockpot, which many people already do. By simply adding a step to your dinner preparations, you’ll save money, time, and resources, all the while creating your very own liquid gold.

Bone Broth - Coconuts & Kettlebells

For this recipe, you’ll need a slow cooker. At just under $50, it’s quite possibly the best kitchen tool I’ve ever purchased because it allows me to make dinners when I’m busy, and cook things like whole chickens, stews, and yes—homemade bone broth in bulk. Mine typically runs 2-3 days per week. You can thank me later.

Simple Homemade Chicken Bone Broth

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Simple Homemade Chicken Bone Broth
 
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This super simple homemade chicken bone broth recipe is so easy, you'll barely even notice you're making it.
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Ingredients
Directions
  1. Rinse chicken, rub with 1-2 tbsp spices, and place in crockpot
  2. Cook chicken on "Low" for 6-8 hours
  3. Debone chicken, and add bones, skin, and giblets (minus the liver!) back into the crockpot
  4. Add distilled water, unprocessed sea salt and pepper, and 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar to crockpot. Water should be about 1 – 1.5 inches above bones.
  5. Cook liquid on "High" for 1-2 hours, and then switch to "Low" for 12-24 hours
  6. Strain bone broth through metal strainer, and store in large containers

Tips & Tricks

This homemade bone broth is great for using with soup, chili, and stew dishes, which makes the dish more flavorful and nutrient-dense. If you plan to drink your homemade chicken bone broth straight, I recommend adding a bit of unrefined sea salt and pepper (1/3 tsp each) to your bone broth before simmering.

The amount of water you use will depend on how big the carcass is, how big your slow cooker is, and whether or not you’d like your bone broth to “gel.” I typically fill my crockpot with water about 1 inch above covering the bones—or about 3 quarts.

If you’re bone broth doesn’t gel, consider reducing the water, or adding more jointy bones to the mixture, like chicken necks or feet. Local farmers sell both of these items for as cheap as $1/lb. You can also add gelatin to bone broth, which will make it gel in the event yours doesn’t. Regardless, homemade bone broth is still nutrient-dense and full of goodness.

Be sure to add all the contents leftover after deboning the chicken to your crockpot, including cartilage, extra skin, and any giblets that came with your chicken, like the neck. Do NOT add the liver, as it will make the bone broth bitter.

I highly recommend only making bone broth from chickens that are pasture-raised and come from your local farmer. Check out how to do that in 6 Ways to Start Eating Locally.

Got any additional questions about this homemade chicken bone broth recipe? Ask away below!

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